Abbot Crinan Mormaer DUNKELD
(Abt 975-1045)
Princess Beatrice SCOTLAND
(Abt 980-)
Prince Boedhe SCOTLAND
(Abt 990-)
Bernicia AEFFLAED
(Abt 994-)
King Duncan MacCrinan SCOTLAND, I
(Abt 1001-1040)
Queen Sibyl Fitz Siward Northumberland SCOTLAND
(Abt 1003-1040)
King Malcolm Canmore SCOTLAND, III
(Abt 1031-1093)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Princess Ingibjorg Finnsdatter ORKNEY

2. Queen Saint Margaret Cerdic SCOTLAND

King Malcolm Canmore SCOTLAND, III

  • Born: Abt 1031-1033, Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
  • Married (1): Abt 1059, Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
  • Married (2): Abt 1062-1069, Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
  • Died: 13 Nov 1093, Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England
  • Buried: Church, Holy Trinity, Dunfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland

   Cause of his death was Killed At War.

   Other names for Malcolm were "The Big Head", "Ceannmor", Eadgyth, Maud, SCOTLAND King and "Canmore".

   Ancestral File Number: 8XJB-53. User ID: 151277958/302555656.

   General Notes:

"Canmore" or "Ceannmor" or "The Big Head", King of SCOTLAND Reigned 1057/
1058-1093, Killed KQGB.

BOOKS
Robert the Bruce King of Scots, Ronald McNair Scott, Carroll & Graf Publishers Inc, New York, 1982.
p3: "For over two hundred years, since Birnam Wood came to Dunsinane and the forces of Malcolm III had defeated and slain Macbeth, the House of Canmore had been the rulers of Scotland. During the reigns of eight succeeding kings of that blood, by conquest or by treaty, the realm had been enlarged so that when Alexander wed Yolande she became the queen of a kingdom which differed little in extent from the Scotland of the present day..."

Barber Grandparents: 125 Kings, 143 Generations, Ted Butler Bernard and Gertrude Barber Bernard, 1978, McKinney TX, p89: "397A Malcolm III, King of Scotland, (S of 374, F of 407); (The genealogy of Malcolm III goes back through the A's to Adam and Eve which is a part of the Ann Gorsuch genealogy as explained in the introduction to Chapter II. This Gorsuch branch is discontinued here, but ties in with Malcolm's wife, Margaret, which is continued as a part of the Barber genealogy.)"

Kings and Queens of Europe, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute 1989: "Malcolm III Ceannmor, Son of Duncan I and Sybil, King of Scotland 1058-1093, Mar =1 (?2) Ingeborg Orkney, =2 Margaret Sister of Edward Atheling Died 1093, Died 1093."

Kings and Queens of Great Britain, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute, 1990: "Malcolm III Ceannore (Bighead) King of Scotland 1058- 1093, Son of Duncan I and Aelflaed, Mar =1 (?3) Ingibiorg (?Gruoch) widow of Thorfinn Earl of Orkney, =2 St Margaret Daughter of Edgar the Exile, Killed 1093 ...St Margaret Mar = (2) Malcolm III King of Scotland."

The Political History of England, Vol II, George Burton Adams Longmans Green and Co, 1905, Ch I, p31:
"...Early in the summer of 1068 the army began its march upon York, advancing along a line somewhat to the west of the centre of England, as the situation would naturally demand. As in William's earlier marches, so here again he encountered no resistance. Whatever may have been the extent of the conspiracy or the plans of the leaders, the entire movement collapsed before the Norman's firm dietermination to be master of the kingdom. Edwin and Morcar had collected an army andwre in the field somewhere between Warwick and Northampton, but when the time came when the fight could no longer be postponed, they thought better of it, besought the king's favour again, and obtained at least the show of it...
"The present expedition went no further north, but its influence extended further. Ethelwin, the Bishop of Durham, came in and made his submission. He bore inquires also from Malcolm, the king of Scots, who had been listening to the appeals for aid fromthe enemies of William, and preparing himself to advance to their assistance. The Bishop of Durham was sent back to let him know what assurances would be acceptable to William, and he undoubtedly also informed him of the actual state of affairssouth of his borders, of the progress which the invader had made, and of the hopelessness of resistance. The Normans at any rate believed that as a result of the bishop's mission Malcolm was gald to send down an embassy of his own which tendered to William an oath of obedience. It is not likely that William attached much weight to any profession of the Scottish king's. Already, probably as soon as the failure of this northern undertaking was apparent, some of the most prominent of the English, who seem to have taken part in it, had abandoned England and gone to the Scottish court. It is very possible that Edgar and his two sisters, Margaret and Christina, sought the protection of Malcolm at this time...These men had earlier submitted to William...and had been received with favour. Under what circumstances they turned against him we do not know, but they had very likely attracted by the promise of strength in this effort at resistance, and were now less inclinedthan the unstable Edwin to profess so early a repentance. Margaret, whether she went to Scotland at this time or a little later, found there a permanent home, consenting against her will to become the bride of Malcolm instead of the bride of the Church as she had wished. As queen she gained, through teaching her wild subjects, bu the example of gentle manners and noble life, a wider mission than the convent could have furnished her. The conditions which Malcolm accepted evidently contained no demand as to any English fugitives, nor any other to which he could seriously object. William was usually able to discern the times, and did not attempt the impracticable."
p90: [1093] "...On his return to Scotland he immediately took arms, and again invaded Northumberland. This, however, was destined to be the last of his incursions, for he was killed, together with his eldest son, Edward, near Alnwick, on the eastern coast. The news of the death of her husband andson at once proved fatal to Queen Margaret..."

Wall Chart of World History, Edward Hull, 1988, Studio Editions, Scotland, 1057: "Malcolm III, King of Scotland 1057-1093, "The Big Head", Son of Duncan, Killed..."

The Story of Civilization, Will Durant, Vol IV, The Age of Faith, Bk V, The Climax of Christianity, Ch XXV, The Recovery of Europe, Sec IX, Scotland, p683: "Malcolm III (1058-1093) was a warrior who repeatedly invaded England..."

Enclyclopaedia Britannica, 1981, Micropaedia, Vol VI, p529, Malcolm III Canmore: "Born Abt 1031, Died 13 Nov 1093 near Alnwick Northumberland, King of Scotland from 1058-1093, founder of the dynasty that consolidated royal power in the Scottish kingdom. The son of King Duncan I (ruled 1034-1040), he lived in exile in England during part of the reign of his father's murderer, Macbeth (ruled 1040-1057). Malcolm killed Macbeth in battle in 1057 and then ascended the throne. After the conquest of England by William, Duke of Normandy, in 1066, Malcolm gave refuge to the Anglo-Saxon Prince Edgar the Aetheling and his sisters, one of whom, Margaret (later Saint Margaret), became his second wife."
"Malcolm acknowledged the overlordship of William in 1072 but nevertheless soon violated his feudal obligations and made five raids into England. During the last of these invasions he was killed by the forces of King William II Rufus (ruled 1087-1100). Except for a brief interval after Malcolm's death, the Scottish throne remained in his family until the death of Queen Margaret, the Maid of Norway, in 1290. Of Malcolm's six sons by Margaret, three succeeded to the throne: Edgar (ruled 1097-1107), Alexander I (1107-1124), and David I (1124-1153)."

The New Columbia Encyclopedia, 1975, p2455, Scotland: "Under Malcolm III, who married St Margaret of Scotland (an English princess), there began a reorganization of the Scottish church and a gradual Anglicization of the Lowland peoples. Malcolm invaded England after rejecting the claim of William II of England to sovereignity over Scotland, but peace followed the marriage of Malcolm's daughter to Henry I of England and allowed the process of feudalization in Scotland to continue. Althoughthe clan system, based on blood relationships and personal loyalty to a chieftain survived in the Highlands, feudal property laws were generally adopted in the Lowlands in the 11th and 12th centuries..."

p1672, Malcolm III: "(Malcolm Canmore), died 1093, King of Scotland (1057-1093), son of Duncan I; successor to MacBeth (Died 1057). It took him some years after Bacbeth's death to regain the boundaries of his father's kingdom. About 1068, Edgar Atheling, pretender to the English throne, took refuge with Malcolm, who soon married Edgar's sister Margaret (Saint, of Scotland). On behalf of Edgar, Malcolm invaded N England, but in 1072, William I of England invaded Scotland, and Malcolm made peace with him. In the reign of William II, Edgar joined Malcolm in his raid into England in 1091, but William forced both men to submit and to do homage. Malcolm was killed at Alnwick on still another raid into England. His frequent wars insured the independence of his kingdom, which made possible the great ecclisiastical reorganization initiated by his wife, Margaret. Malcolm was succeeded by his brother Donald Bane, but later three of Malcolm's sons were kings of Scotland- Edgar (reigned 1097-1107), Alexander I,and David I. Malcolm's daughter Edith (renamed Matilda) married Henry I of England, and another daughter was mother to the wife of King Stephen of England."

From Alfred to Henry III 871-1272, Christopher Brooke, 1961, Norton Library History ofEngland, p197-198: "The most widely known event in Scottish history before the late thirteenth century is the destruction of Macbeth and the accession of Malcolm III. These events have been wonderfully telescoped in Shakespeare's play- old Siward's victory took place in 1054, Macbeth held out until 1057, and not until 1058 was Malcolm hailed as King of Scotland. Our serious knowledge of Scottish history, the story of Normand infiltration and the effective unity of the Scottish kingdom all date from the accession of Malcom `Canmore' (`big head') in 1058. There had been a long preparation for this unity. By the tenth century most of northern and western Scotland was subject to the kings of the Scots and of Strathclyde. Fora brief while King Edmund united the two kingdoms. More significant, in the late tenth or early eleventh century the English lands between the Forth and the Tweed, then known as the Lothian, became part of the Scottish kingdom...The attachmentof a new province, reasonably prosperous and closely allied in culture and institutions to the English kingdom, permanently shifted the centres of power in Scotland and ultimately changed the character of the kingdom. Lothian provided a base such as the Welsh princes never possessed.
"Lothian finally joined Scotland in 1018, in the reign of Malcolm II, who also won Strathclyde for his grandson, Shakespeare's Duncan, first king of all Scotland. But the dynasty and the union wereboth insecure before the accession of Malcolm III. Malcolm himself had the idea then traditional among Scottish rulers, that their profession was to raid England; but the Norman Conquest of England had the effect of filling the Scottish court with distinguished English leaders, the greatest of whom was Malcom's second wife, Margaret, sister of Edgar the Aetheling, better known as St Margaret of Scotland..."

INTERNET
Draper Gedcom
http://www.my-ged.com/db/page/draper/01298
Malcolm III., grandson of Malcolm II., King of Scotland, called Canmore (Caen Mor, or great head) because of the large size of his head, was born in 1024, before his father was called to the throne, and he became king at the time of his victory over Macbeth in 1039, remaining so until his death in 1093. He was buried at Icelmkill. He married about 1059 (1) Ingibiorg, and about 1069 (2) Margaret (St. Margaret), daughter of Edward the Exile (Etheling). ("The Genealogy of Homer Beers James", V1, JANDA Consultants, 1993 Homer James) The eldest son of Duncan I, Malcolm is best known for his role in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" and in the hagiography of his wife, Margaret of England, granddaughter of Edmund Ironside. English influence grew as a result of his exile in England (from 1040) and his marriage (c. 1069) to Margaret, a severe, pious, and domineering woman. He may have married his first wife, Ingibjorg (d. c. 1069), probably the earl of Orkeny's daughter, to gain help against Macbeth, though Malcolm did not secure the throne until Macbeth (1057) and his stepson (1058) were killed. He sought to extend his rule southwards, though not with conspicuous success, and if he encouraged Hardrada's invasion (1066), he miscalculated for it enabled William of Normandy to land unopposed. The Conqueror forced Malcolm to become "his man" (1070), and in the last of his invasions of England (1093) Malcolm and his eldest son by Margaret were killed; his widow died three days later on hearing the news. Malcolm was a benefactor of churches, including Durham; his wife became a saint (1249), her reputation enhanced by her confessor's eulogy. The internal stability and English character of Malcolm's reign are indicated by the succession of this three sons Edgar (1097) and Alexander (1107) (both of whom married daughters of Henry I of England) and David I (1124), after a brief struggle between Malcolm's eldest son, Duncan II (1094) and his younger brother Donald III Bane (1093-1097). In Edgard's time, these southern ways were resented by some, and c. 1098 Magnus Barelegs, king of Norway, reasserted Norwegian sovereignty in the Western Isles (including Iona). ("The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Monarchy", Cannon, John and Ralph Griffiths, Oxford Univ Press: 1988, p 123) Called Canmore (Ceanmohr, or Great-head), King of Scotland, was eldest son of Duncan, who was murdered by Macbeth in 1039. After Duncan's death Malcolm fled for safety to his kinsman, Siward, Danish Earl of Northumberland, and continued to live for many years in England. In 1054 Siward, with the sanction of Edward the Confessor, led an army into Scotland, encountered Macbeth near Dunsinane, defeated him, and left Malcolm in possession. Macbeth retired into the North, and the contest was only ended in 1056, by his defeat and death at Lumphanan. Malcolm remained at peace with England during the reign of Edward the Confessor, but on the accession of Harold he favoured the attempt of Tostig. After the battle of Hastings he welcomed to his court Edgar the Atheling, with his mother and two sisters, and soon married one of them, the Princess Margaret. In 1070 he invaded England, ravaged Durham, and carried off so many prisoners that for years after English slaves were found in every hamlet of Scotland. This raid was avenged by a more savage and destructive devastation of Northumbria by William the Conqueror. Malcolm agreed to do homage, and Edgar left his court, but he continued to give his protection to the English exiles. Disputes arose with William Rufus, and in 1091 Malcolm again invaded England, but retired without fighting. William invaded Scotland the next year, but peace was made by the mediation of Duke Robert and Edgar. In 1093 Malcolm once more made an incursion into England and besieged Alnwick Castle. He was attacked by Roger de Mowbray and killed in the battle, November 13th of that year. His queen, Margaret, heard the tidings, and died three days later. [Internet source: http://cs6400.mcc.ac.uk/genuki/big/royalty/kingscot.html#MalcolmIII]

ANCESTRAL FILE
Ancestral File Ver 4.10 Mar Margaret ?1007/1009, 8XJB-53 Mar Margaret 1067/1069 Atholl Scotland, Ancestral File Ver 4.11 8XJB-53 Born Abt 1033 Atholl Perthshire Scotland Mar 1067/1069 Atholl Perthshire Scotland.

ANCESTRY.COM
World Ancestral Chart No. 10002 Patricia (Downey) Adams
Ancestors of Warren Cash 1760:
Malcolm III Caennmor
Malcolm III was crowned at Scone, ten miles north of what became Cash about a century later. In 1057, MacDuff, 1st Earl of Fife, undoubtedly seated him on the inaugural stone, that ancient symbol of Celtic Kingship used in Eire for centuries, and brought to Scotia with our Dalriadain Scots in 464. From then on, Earls of Fife placed succeeding Kings on the sacred "Stone of Scone", as one of the hereditary privileges granted them in perpetuity by Malcolm III.
Feudalism came into royal favor as a way of life and government under Malcolm III in 1057. It is said that Margaret, his Queen, had favored it and urged him to foster and extend it. Simply, it was mainly the granting of Crown lands to overlords who were loyal to the King, then allowing them to govern their territories so long as they adhered to the Kings policies. In the case of large private holdings, the owner was brought into closer fealty to the King, joined in the councils, perhaps granted the title of Earl.
People would band together around the chief landholder, whether he held possession by Royal Charter, lease, or mere 'sword right'. Thus, the Clans of Scotland were born. The word means 'children' ... clustered about their leader, regarding him as chieftain, defender, counselr and father figure -- Clan MacDuff, Clan MacIntosh, Clan MacCash, etc. Sometimes clan fought clan on matters of boundary or principle. Occasionally an unworthy Chief might be slain and replaced by his Clan. The Kings government was remote and distant; often his occasional emmissaries were not too efficient, or their influence disruptive to local life and custom. Therefore, the Clan system proved ideal by having at hand a local leader who could act in disputes, give counsel, or lead in defense if necessary. This fostered the "Spirit of the Clan"; it developed in the Scotland Highlands a "Clanship" that became a great social force, unlike the tribalism that destroyed itself in so many countries, notably Ireland. The Clans have survived centuries of the invasions of Scotland.

ANCESTRY.COM
World Ancestral Chart No. 10002 Patricia (Downey) Adams Ancestors of Warren Cash 1760.
World Ancestral Chart No.31759 Ancestors of Warren Cash 1760:
The information in this section on Malcolm I up to the time of William Cash of Scotland was found in a book with the personal belongings of Earl F. Downey of Kansas City, Kansas. The name of the book is CASH. The book was compiled by Don Leslie Cash of San Diego, California. Begun 08 May 1973, amended 24 Jan 1976, and completed 10 Mar 1976. None of this information may be reproduced for the purpose of resale without the written permission of the Don Cash family.
Malcolm III was crowned at Scone, ten miles north of what became Cash about a century later. In 1057, MacDuff, 1st Earl of Fife, undoubtedly seated him on the inaugural stone, that ancient symbol of Celtic Kingship used in Eire for centuries, and brought to Scotia with our Dalriadain Scots in 464. From then on, Earls of Fife placed succeeding Kings on the sacred "Stone of Scone", as one of the hereditary privileges granted them in perpetuity by Malcolm III.
Feudalism came into royal favor as a way of life and government under Malcolm III in 1057. It is said that Margaret, his Queen, had favored it and urged him to foster and extend it. Simply, it was mainly the granting of Crown lands to overlords who were loyal to the King, then allowing them to govern their territories so long as they adhered to the Kings policies. In the case of large private holdings, the owner was brought into closer fealty to the King, joined in the councils, perhaps granted the title of Earl.
People would band together around the chief landholder, whether he held possession by Royal Charter, lease, or mere 'sword right'. Thus, the Clans of Scotland were born. The word means 'children' ... clustered about their leader, regarding him as chieftain, defender, counselor and father figure -- Clan MacDonald, Clan MacDuff, Clan MacIntosh, Clan MacCash, etc. Sometimes clan fought clan on matters of boundary or principle. Occasionally an unworthy Chief might be slain and replaced by his Clan. The Kings government was remote and distant; often his occasional emissaries were not too efficient, or their influence disruptive to local life and custom. Therefore, the Clan system proved ideal by having at hand a local leader who could act in disputes, give counsel, or lead in defense if necessary. This fostered the "Spirit of the Clan"; it developed in the Scotland Highlands a "Clanship" that became a great social force, unlike the tribalism that destroyed itself in so many countries, notably Ireland. The Clans have survived centuries of the invasions of Scotland.

Information found on the Internet:
Ever since his Father, Duncan I, had been killed by MacBeth (Shakespeare's MacBeth), Malcolm's objective had been to regain his Father's title and territory. One of his kinsmen, Earl Siward of Northumbria, helped Malcolm in his cause.
Siward invaded Scotland in 1054, driving MacBeth further North and putting Malcolm on the throne of Cumbria. But he failed to topple MacBeth from the throne.
In 1057, MacBeth's major ally, Thorfinn, Earl of Orkney, died, and Malcolm made his move. He killed MacBeth in battle near Elgin. Just months later, in March of 1058, he killed MacBeth's stepson, Lulach, and re-established the MacAlpin dynasty.

   Marriage Information:

Malcolm married Princess Ingibjorg Finnsdatter ORKNEY, daughter of Earl Finn Arnesson HALLAND and Bergliot HALFDANSDATTER, about 1059 in Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland. (Princess Ingibjorg Finnsdatter ORKNEY was born about 1021 in Osteraat, Yrje, Norway and died about 1066.)

   Marriage Information:

Malcolm also married Queen Saint Margaret Cerdic SCOTLAND, daughter of Prince Edward ENGLAND and Lady Agatha Von Brunswick AUGSBURG, about 1062-1069 in Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland. (Queen Saint Margaret Cerdic SCOTLAND was born about 1043-1045 in , Wessex, England, died on 16 Nov 1093 in Castle, Edinburgh, Mid-Lothian, Scotland and was buried in Dunfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland.)


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