King Henry ENGLAND, III
(1206-1272)
Queen Eleanor Provence ENGLAND
(Abt 1217-1291)
King Saint Ferdinand CASTILE & LEON, III
(1201-1252)
Countess Joanna Dammartin PONTHIEU
(Abt 1200-1279)
King Edward ENGLAND, I
(1239-1307)
Queen Eleanor Castile ENGLAND
(Abt 1244-1290)
Duchess Joan Acre GLOUCESTER
(1272-1307)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Earl Gilbert De Clare GLOUCESTER

2. Earl Ralph De Monthermer GLOUCESTER
  • Thomas MONTHERMER

Duchess Joan Acre GLOUCESTER

  • Born: 1272, Acre, Jerusalem, Palestine
  • Married (1): 30 Apr 1290, Abbey, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England
  • Married (2): Jan 1296-1297, Akko, Hazafon, Israel
  • Died: 23 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England
  • Buried: 26 Apr 1307, Church, Priory, Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England

   Other names for Joan were GLOUCESTER Duchess, ACRE, ENGLAND Princess, HERTFORD Countess, Joanna and PLANTAGENET.

   Ancestral File Number: 84ZQ-DM. User ID: 19743151.

   General Notes:

Born During Crusade.

Princess of ENGLAND, Duchess of GLOUCESTER, Countess of HERTFORD.

SOURCES
84ZQ-DM, The Lives of the Kings and Queens of England Antonia Fraser 1975 Alfred Knopf p70, IGI Marriage T990362-123-0884799, IGI Birth T990361-186- 08847798, Political History of England 1216-1377 Vol III T F Tout AMS Press 1905 p134, 143-144, 173, 223, The New Columbia Encyclopedia 1975 p1094, A History of the Plantagenets Vol III The Three Edwards Thomas B Costain 1951 Doubleday & Co p14, Kings and Queens of Great Britain Genealogical Chart Anne Taute and Romilly Squire 1990, Barber Grandparents: 125 Kings 143 Generations Ted Butler Bernard and Gertrude Barber Bernard 1978 McKinney TX p97.

BOOKS
Barber Grandparents: 125 Kings, 143 Generations, Ted Butler Bernard and Gertrude Barber Bernard, 1978, McKinney TX, p97: "461P Gilbert De Clare, Earl of Herts and Gloucester (S of 452, F of 467); married Princess Jane or Joan."

Kings and Queens of Great Britain, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, 1990: "Joan of Acre, Mar =1 (2) Gilbert De Clare, =2 Ralph De Monthermer, Died 1307."

A History of the Plantagenets, Vol III, The Three Edwards, Thomas B Costain, 1958, Doubleday & Co
p22: "There is a disagreement among authorities as to the number of child- ren presented to Edward by his queen, some saying fifteen, others claiming a total of seventeen. On one point there is accord, however. Only four of the children were sons. Of the eleven or thirteen daughters, as the case may be, a number died in their infancy and nothing is known about them, not even their names. Withthose who lingered just long enough to acquire names, there has been little statistical recognition. Let us pick out one at random from the long list: Eleanor, Joanna, Margaret, Berengaria, Mary, Elizabeth, Alice, Blanche, Beatrice, Katherine...
"This much is well established, that all the royal children shared the Plantagenet beauty. Some of the daughters were blond and blue-eyed, some were cast in the duskier mold of Castile...
"Edward loved all his daughters devotedly, but he must have looked them over with an uneasy eye. Daughters made poor successors to a throne as contentious as that of England."

A History of the Plantagenets, Vol III, The Three Edwards, Thomas B Costain, 1958, Doubleday & Co
p14 Family Tree: "Joanna of Acre, 1272-1307, Mar (1) Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, (2) Ralph de Monthermer..."
p22: "There is a disagreement among authorities as to the number of child- ren presented to Edward by his queen, some saying fifteen, others claiming a total of seventeen. On one point there is accord, however. Only four of the children were sons. Of the eleven or thirteen daughters, as the case may be, a number died in their infancy and nothing is known about them, noteven their names. With those who lingered just long enough to acquire names, there has been little statistical recognition. Let us pick out one at random from the long list: Eleanor, Joanna, Margaret, Berengaria, Mary, Elizabeth, Alice, Blanche, Beatrice, Katherine...
"This much is well established, that all the royal children shared the Plantagenet beauty. Some of the daughters were blond and blue-eyed, some were cast in the duskier mold of Castile. Eleanor, the first, seems to have been the great beauty of the family. The second, Joanna, who was born at Acre and named after her maternal grandmother, was dark and of an imperious temper. She was left for several years at the court of Castile with her grandparents, who worshipped her, and she seems even at that tender age to have carried things off with a high hand. They could not fail to be bright, these children of a really great father and a vital and beautiful mother; all but one, and that story will have to be told later...
"Edward loved all his daughters devotedly, but he must have looked them over with an uneasy eye. Daughters made poor successors to a throne as contentious as that of England."
p43: "The histories of three of theprincesses, Eleanor, Joanna, and Margaret, seem to run in a pattern. In an age when marriages, particularly in royal families, were arranged when the principals were little more than infants, these three daughters of England's greatest king seem to have found some belated happiness..."
"In April 1290 the fiery-spirited, sloe-eyed Joanna of Acre married England's most powerful peer, second to the king in importance, Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester. Joanna, too, had been given in betrothal at the age of five, to Prince Hartman, son of the King of the Romans. Edward seems to have arranged future marriages for his daughters with no idea of permitting their consummation but as perhaps a help toward some political expediency of the moment. Also, it is often plain that he could not part with his dearly loved daughters. Poor Prince Hartman went skating one winter's day. The story is that he accidentally fell into open reaches where the water was deep, and drowned.
"Gilbert de Clare was not young when he married Joanna and took her to live at his country retreat in Clerkenwell, not far from the Tower, where the king and queen were again in residence. She left for her new home with great fanfare, laden with royal gifts...
"Joanna was but twenty-three when the old Earl of Gloucester died. After being a widow a year, she secretly married a completely unknown squire in her late husband's retinue, Ralph de Monthermer. Through this marriage he came possessed in his own right of the earldoms of Gloucester and Hertford. The fact that a royal princess had dared to marry this obscure fellow became a `cause celebre' which for a time separated her from the affection of her father. It proved to be a happy marriage, however, leading ultimately to a firm friendship between the new son-in-law and Edward."
p134: "In London the new king [Edward II] piled mistake on mistake. Here his lost friend awaited him, Brother Perrot in a coat of rich material from the East and a plume in his hat, and his mind filled with all the latest quips and anecdotes. The reunion was most affectionate and the king conferred on Gaveston the earldom of Cornwall; a most injudicious act, for this title had always been reserved for members of the royal family and it carried with it, moreover, an interest in the tin mines of Cornwall, those great stannaries from which came the close packed bundles conveyed everyday down the tin trail to the markets of Europe. Then he betrothed the gay jackanapes from Gascony to a member of the royal family, his niece, Margaret of Gloucester. Margaret was the daughter of his giddy and willful sister, Joanna of Acre. At first the girlseemed willing enough, for Master Perrot was handsome and high of spirits. Later the marriage would become a source of much trouble."
p145: "His own brother-in-law, Gloucester, was loudly libeled as `Filz a puteyne', the whore's son, an allusion to willful Princess Joanna, who had run away and married a man not even a knight when her elderly first husband died."

Political History of England 1216-1377, Vol III, T F Tout, AMS Press, 1905,
p134: "...Nowhere save in France did the Holy War win more powerful recruits than in England. In 1268 Edward himself took the cross, and with him his brother Edmund of Lancaster, his cousin Henry of Almaine, and many leading lords of both factions. Financial difficulties delayedthe departure of the crusaders, and it was not until 1270 that Edward and Henry were able to start. On reaching Provence, they learnt that Louis had turned his arms against Tunis, whither they followed him with all speed. On Edward's arrival off Tunis, he found that Louis was dead and that Philip III, the new French king, had concluded a truce with the misbelievers. Profoundly mortified by this treason to Christendom, Edward set forth with his little squadron to Acre, the chief townof Palestine that still remained in Christian hands...Edward remained in Palestine until August, 1272, and threw all his wonted fire and courage into the hopeless task of upholding the fast decaying Latin kingdom. At last alarming news of hisfather's health brought him back to Europe..."
p143: "...[1274] It was a veritable triumph for Edward, when Gregory X, though attracted for a moment by the prospect of a strong emperor capable of landing a crusade, accepted the choice of the German magnates who, in terror of France, elected as King of the Romans the strenuous but not overmighty Swabian count, Rudolf of Hapsburg..."
p144: "...Rudolf lent himself to their plans by investing Margart with Provence. Edward's filial piety and political interests made him a willing partner in these designs. In 1278 he betrothed his daughter Joan of Acre to Hartmann, the son of the King of the Romans. The plan of Edward and Rudolf was to revive in some fashion the kingdom of Arles in favour of the young couple..."
p173: "...Fear of Edward drove nobles into obedience as well as ministers into honesty. Gloucester desisted unwillingly from his attacks on Brecon, and was constrained to divorce his wife and marry the king's daughter, Joan of Acre. In becoming the king's son-in-law, he was forced to surrender his estates to the crown, receiving them back entailed on the heirs of the marriage or, in their default, on the heirs of Joan..."
p223: "...The heavy hand of Edward fell upon earls as well as upon bish- ops...The old leaders of opposition were dead or powerless. Ralph of Monthermer, the simple north-country knight who had won the hand of Joan of Acre, ruled over the Gloucester-Glamorgan inheritance on belf of his wife and Edward's little grandson, Gilbert of Clare..."

The New Columbia Encyclopedia, 1975, p1094, Gloucester Gilbert De Clare 8th Earl of: "1243-1295, English nobleman, son of the 7th Earl. He married (1253) Alice de Lusignan, niece of Henry III, and succeeded to the Earldom in 1262... His first marriage was annulled, and in 1290 he married Edward's daughter Joan. He also held the titles of Earl of Clare, and Earl of Hertford, as did his son byJoan, Gilbert de Clare, 9th Earl of Gloucester (1291-1314), who served Edward II faithfully and was killed at the battle of Bannockburn."

The Lives of the Kings and Queens of England, Antonia Fraser, 1975, Alfred Knopf, p70: "Joan of Acre, 1272-1307, mar (1) Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester, mar (2) Ralph de Monthermer..."

INTERNET
Draper Gedcom
http://www.my-ged.com/db/page/draper/02033
Joan (Joanna) Plantaganet of Acre, born in 1272, in Acre in the Holy Land during a crusade, died in April 1307. She was looked after in Ponthieu, by her maternal grandmother, Jeanne of Dammartin, much of her childhood. She married in 1290, (1) Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, who died in 1295, and later, a clandestine marriage, to (2) Ralph de Monthermer, who died in 1307. ("The Genealogy of Homer Beers James", V1, JANDA Consultants, 1993 Homer James)

ANCESTRY.COM
World Ancestral Chart No. 17450 Ancestors of Wayne G Thorpe and Olive Loraine Slade: Joan Plantagenet.

ANCESTRAL FILE
Ancestral File Ver 4.10 84ZQ-DM Joan, TTE Joanna, KQGB Joan of Acre.

INTERNATIONAL GENEALOGICAL INDEX
IGI Marriage T990362-123-0884799 Gilbert DE CLARE Earl of Gloucester Spouse Joan Princess of ENGLAND May 1290 Westminster Abbey Westminster London England.

IGI Birth T990361-186-08847798 Gilbert DE CLARE Earl of Gloucester Father Gilbert DE CLARE Earl of GloucesterMother Joan Princess of ENGLAND 10 May 1291 Winchcomb Gloucester England.

   Marriage Information:

Joan married Earl Gilbert De Clare GLOUCESTER, son of Earl Richard De Clare GLOUCESTER and Countess Maud De Lacy GLOUCESTER, on 30 Apr 1290 in Abbey, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England. (Earl Gilbert De Clare GLOUCESTER was born on 2 Sep 1243 in Church, Christ, Hampshire, England, died on 7 Dec 1295 in Castle, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, England and was buried on 22 Dec 1295 in Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.)

   Marriage Information:

Joan also married Earl Ralph De Monthermer GLOUCESTER in Jan 1296-1297 in Akko, Hazafon, Israel. (Earl Ralph De Monthermer GLOUCESTER died in 1305-1325.)


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